Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/13528
Title: ROLE OF NA+/K+ EXCHANGE AND ORGANIC-ACIDS IN BASE INDUCED HYPERPOLARIZATION OF RENAL PROXIMAL AMPHIBIAN TUBULE
Authors: STEELS, Paul 
GRANITZER, Marita 
GRANITZER, Marita 
STEELS, Paul 
Issue Date: 1991
Publisher: ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Source: BIOCHIMICA ET BIOPHYSICA ACTA, 1066 (1), p. 111-114
BIOCHIMICA ET BIOPHYSICA ACTA, 1066(1). p. 111-114
Abstract: Fast peritubular alkaline perturbations in Necturus renal proximal tubule evoke hyperpolarizations of the basolateral membrane. These voltage changes are partly due to an increase in basolateral K+-permeability. Additional role of the Na+/K+-ATPase and organic acids in generating these base induced hyperpolarizations (BIH) can be deduced from the reduction in BIH during low K+, high amiloride or omission of organic acids.
Fast peritubular alkaline perturbations in Necturus renal proximal tubule evoke hyperpolarizations of the basolateral membrane. These voltage changes are partly due to an increase in basolateral K+-permeability. Additional role of the Na+/K+-ATPase and organic acids in generating these base induced hyperpolarizations (BIH) can be deduced from the reduction in BIH during low K+, high amiloride or omission of organic acids.
Notes: LIMBURGS UNIV CENTRUM,DEPT WNIFYSIOL,B-3610 DIEPENBEEK,BELGIUM.
Keywords: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Biophysics;HYPERPOLARIZATION; PH EFFECT; SODIUM POTASSIUM ION EXCHANGE; ORGANIC ACID; BASOLATERAL MEMBRANE POTENTIAL; MEMBRANE POTENTIAL; PROXIMAL TUBULE; (NECTURUS KIDNEY);HYPERPOLARIZATION; PH EFFECT; SODIUM POTASSIUM ION EXCHANGE; ORGANIC ACID; BASOLATERAL MEMBRANE POTENTIAL; MEMBRANE POTENTIAL; PROXIMAL TUBULE; (NECTURUS KIDNEY)
Document URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/3903
http://hdl.handle.net/1942/13528
ISSN: 0005-2728
e-ISSN: 1879-2650
ISI #: A1991FW86900019
Type: Journal Contribution
Appears in Collections:Research publications

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