Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/6867
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVAN ROMPAEY, Bart-
dc.contributor.authordu Bois, Bart-
dc.contributor.authorDemeyer, Serge-
dc.date.accessioned2007-12-20T16:11:08Z-
dc.date.available2007-12-20T16:11:08Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Software Maintenance (ICSM2006), September 2006. p. 391-400-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1942/6867-
dc.description.abstractTest code, just like any other code we write, erodes when frequently changed. As such, refactoring, which has been shown to impact maintainability and comprehensibility, can be part of a solution to counter this erosion. We propose a metric-based heuristical approach, which allows to rank occurrences of so-called test smells (i.e. symptoms of poorly designed tests) according to their relative significance. This ranking can subsequently be used to start refactoring. Through an open-source case study, ArgoUML, we demonstrate that we are able to identify those test cases who violate unit test criteria.-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publishers.l. IEEE Computer Society 2006-
dc.titleCharacterizing the relative significance of a test smell-
dc.typeJournal Contribution-
dc.identifier.epage400-
dc.identifier.spage391-
local.bibliographicCitation.jcatA3-
local.type.refereedNon-Refereed-
local.type.specifiedArticle-
dc.bibliographicCitation.oldjcat-
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/ICSM.2006.18-
item.accessRightsClosed Access-
item.fullcitationVAN ROMPAEY, Bart; du Bois, Bart & Demeyer, Serge (2006) Characterizing the relative significance of a test smell. In: Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Software Maintenance (ICSM2006), September 2006. p. 391-400.-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
Appears in Collections:Non-affiliated authors
Show simple item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

17
checked on Sep 3, 2020

Page view(s)

54
checked on May 20, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.