Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/11828
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dc.contributor.authorMarquez-Garcia, Belen-
dc.contributor.authorHoremans, Nele-
dc.contributor.authorCUYPERS, Ann-
dc.contributor.authorGuisez, Yves-
dc.contributor.authorCordoba, Francisco-
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-23T07:35:16Z-
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTION-
dc.date.available2011-03-23T07:35:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationPLANT PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY, 49(1). p. 110-115-
dc.identifier.issn0981-9428-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1942/11828-
dc.description.abstractErica andevalensis is an endemic species from SW Iberian Peninsula, always growing in metal-enriched and acid soils. In the present study, a comparison was made between wild E. andevalensis plants collected from the field and cultivated ones exposed to different cadmium levels (0, 0.5, 5 and 50 mu M). Wild plants contain higher levels of ascorbic acid (around 8000 nmol g(-1) FW) than lab-cultivated control plants (around 3000 nmol g(-1) FW). Glutathione levels follow an opposite trend being smaller in wild plants than lab-cultivated ones. Moreover, the total antioxidant capacity of wild plants is 90 times higher than in cultivated plants non-exposed to cadmium. Cadmium treatment of lab-cultivated plants did not affect the growth of E. andevalensis or the glutathione levels. However, the total antioxidative capacity increased in plants exposed to 50 mu M of cadmium. Cadmium was added to the soil and it was transported into leaves reaching levels of 3.299 +/- 0.781 mu g Cd/g DW in plants exposed to 50 mu M. These results underline a possible importance of antioxidants in the metal tolerance show by the high antioxidant capacity detected in both wild and lab-cultivated plants exposed to high cadmium levels. (C) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherELSEVIER FRANCE-EDITIONS SCIENTIFIQUES MEDICALES ELSEVIER-
dc.subject.otherAscorbic acid; Ericaceae; Glutathione; Heavy metals; Pyritic Belt; Total antioxidant capacity-
dc.titleAntioxidants in Erica andevalensis: A comparative study between wild plants and cadmium-exposed plants under controlled conditions-
dc.typeJournal Contribution-
dc.identifier.epage115-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage110-
dc.identifier.volume49-
local.format.pages6-
local.bibliographicCitation.jcatA1-
dc.description.notes[Marquez-Garcia, Belen; Cordoba, Francisco] Univ Huelva, Dept Environm Biol & Publ Hlth, Fac Expt Sci, Huelva 21071, Spain. [Horemans, Nele] Belgian Nucl Res Ctr SCK CEN, B-2400 Mol, Belgium. [Cuypers, Ann] Hasselt Univ, Ctr Environm Sci, B-3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium. [Guisez, Yves] Univ Antwerp, Dept Biol Mol Plant Physiol & Biotechnol, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium.-
local.type.refereedRefereed-
local.type.specifiedArticle-
dc.bibliographicCitation.oldjcatA1-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.plaphy.2010.10.007-
dc.identifier.isi000286998800016-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.validationecoom 2012-
item.accessRightsClosed Access-
item.fullcitationMarquez-Garcia, Belen; Horemans, Nele; CUYPERS, Ann; Guisez, Yves & Cordoba, Francisco (2011) Antioxidants in Erica andevalensis: A comparative study between wild plants and cadmium-exposed plants under controlled conditions. In: PLANT PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY, 49(1). p. 110-115.-
crisitem.journal.issn0981-9428-
crisitem.journal.eissn1873-2690-
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