Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/15951
Title: Which Immune Cells Matter? The Immunopathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis
Authors: BROUX, Bieke 
STINISSEN, Piet 
HELLINGS, Niels 
Issue Date: 2013
Source: CRITICAL REVIEWS IN IMMUNOLOGY, 33 (4), p. 283-306
Abstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disease of the central nervous system (CNS), which is believed to be immune-mediated. While CD4(+) T cells have been the main suspects for years, there is ample evidence that other immune cells (including those of the innate immune system) play a contributing or regulating role in this disease. After a general introduction, this review focuses on different immune cell subsets implicated in MS pathogenesis and on current and future possibilities to target them for therapeutic use.
Document URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/15951
ISSN: 1040-8401
e-ISSN: 2162-6472
ISI #: 000325189900001
Category: A1
Type: Journal Contribution
Validations: ecoom 2014
Appears in Collections:Research publications

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