Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/18182
Title: Blood Pressure in Relation to Environmental Lead Exposure in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003 to 2010
Authors: Hara, Azusa
Thijs, Lutgarde
Asayama, Kei
Gu, Yu-Mei
Jacobs, Lotte
Zhang, Zhen-Yu
Liu, Yan-Ping
NAWROT, Tim 
Staessen, Jan A.
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS
Source: HYPERTENSION, 65 (1), p. 62-69
Abstract: In view of the declining environmental lead exposure in the United States, we analyzed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2003-2010) for association of blood pressure and hypertension with blood lead. The 12 725 participants included 21.1% blacks, 20.5% Hispanics, 58.4% whites, and 48.7% women. Blacks compared with non-Blacks had higher systolic and diastolic pressures (126.5 versus 123.9 and 71.9 versus 69.6 mm Hg) and higher hypertension prevalence (44.7 versus 36.8%). Blood lead was lower in whites than in non-whites (1.46 versus 1.57 mu g/dL) and in women than in men (1.25 versus 1.80 mu g/dL). In multivariable analyses of all participants, blood lead doubling was associated with higher (P <= 0.0007) systolic and diastolic pressure (+0.76 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-1.13 and +0.43 mm Hg; 0.18-0.68), but not with the odds of hypertension (0.95; 0.90-1.01; P=0.11). Associations with blood lead were nonsignificant (P >= 0.09) for systolic pressure in women and for diastolic pressure in non-whites. Among men, systolic pressure increased with blood lead (P <= 0.060) with effect sizes associated with blood lead doubling ranging from +0.65 mm Hg in whites to +1.61 mm Hg in blacks. For systolic pressure, interactions of ethnicity and sex with blood lead were all significant (P <= 0.019). In conclusion, small and inconsistent effect sizes in the associations of blood pressure with blood lead likely exclude current environmental lead exposure as a major hypertension cause in the United States.
Notes: [Hara, Azusa; Thijs, Lutgarde; Gu, Yu-Mei; Jacobs, Lotte; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Yan-Ping; Staessen, Jan A.] Univ Leuven, KU Leuven Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Res Unit Hypertens & Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Studies Coordinating Ctr, BE-3000 Leuven, Belgium. [Asayama, Kei] Teikyo Univ, Sch Med, Dept Hyg & Publ Hlth, Tokyo 173, Japan. [Nawrot, Tim S.] Univ Hasselt, Ctr Environm Sci, Hasselt, Belgium. [Staessen, Jan A.] Maastricht Univ, Res Dev Grp VitaK, Maastricht, Netherlands.
Keywords: blood pressure; environmental medicine; hypertension; lead; toxicology;blood pressure; environmental medicine; hypertension; lead; toxicology
Document URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/18182
ISSN: 0194-911X
e-ISSN: 1524-4563
DOI: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.114.04023
ISI #: 000346248800017
Rights: © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.
Category: A1
Type: Journal Contribution
Validations: ecoom 2016
Appears in Collections:Research publications

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