Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/18813
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dc.contributor.authorGENBRUGGE, Cornelia-
dc.contributor.authorMEEX, Ingrid-
dc.contributor.authorBOER, Willem-
dc.contributor.authorJANS, Frank-
dc.contributor.authorHEYLEN, Rene-
dc.contributor.authorFerdinande, Bert-
dc.contributor.authorDENS, Jo-
dc.contributor.authorDE DEYNE, Cathy-
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-30T11:42:41Z-
dc.date.available2015-04-30T11:42:41Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationCRITICAL CARE, 19-
dc.identifier.issn1466-609X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1942/18813-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: By maintaining sufficient cerebral blood flow and oxygenation, the goal of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is to preserve the pre-arrest neurological state. To date, cerebral monitoring abilities during CPR have been limited. Therefore, we investigated the time-course of cerebral oxygen saturation values (rSO(2)) during advanced life support in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Our primary aim was to compare rSO(2) values during advanced life support from patients with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) to patients who did not achieve ROSC. Methods: We performed an observational study to measure rSO(2) using Equanox T (Nonin, Plymouth, MI) from the start of advanced life support in the pre-hospital setting. Results: rSO(2) of 49 consecutive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients were analyzed. The total increase from initial rSO(2) value until two minutes before ROSC or end of advanced life support efforts was significantly larger in the group with ROSC 16% (9 to 36) compared to the patients without ROSC 10% (4 to 15) (P = 0.02). Mean rSO(2) from the start of measurement until two minutes before ROSC or until termination of advanced life support was higher in patients with ROSC than in those without, namely 39% +/- 7 and 31% +/- 4 (P = 0.05) respectively. Conclusions: During pre-hospital advanced life support, higher increases in rSO(2) are observed in patients attaining ROSC, even before ROSC was clinically determined. Our findings suggest that rSO(2) could be used in the future to guide patient tailored treatment during cardiac arrest and could therefore be a surrogate marker of the systemic oxygenation state of the patient.-
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors wish to thank the residents, nursing and medical staff of the emergency unit of Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg for their cooperation and support in this study. They also want to thank Francesca Solmi for statistical support and Eric Caers for English grammar advice. This study is part of the Limburg Clinical Research Program UHasselt-ZOL-Jessa, supported by the foundation Limburg Sterk Merk, Hasselt University, Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg and Jessa Hospital.-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherBIOMED CENTRAL LTD-
dc.rights© 2015 Genbrugge et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.-
dc.titleIncrease in cerebral oxygenation during advanced life support in out-of-hospital patients is associated with return of spontaneous circulation-
dc.typeJournal Contribution-
dc.identifier.volume19-
local.format.pages7-
local.format.pages7-
local.bibliographicCitation.jcatA1-
dc.description.notesCorrespondence: cornelia.genbrugge@uhasselt.be-
local.publisher.placeLONDON-
local.type.refereedRefereed-
local.type.specifiedArticle-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13054-015-0837-5-
dc.identifier.isi000352032100001-
item.fullcitationGENBRUGGE, Cornelia; MEEX, Ingrid; BOER, Willem; JANS, Frank; HEYLEN, Rene; Ferdinande, Bert; DENS, Jo & DE DEYNE, Cathy (2015) Increase in cerebral oxygenation during advanced life support in out-of-hospital patients is associated with return of spontaneous circulation. In: CRITICAL CARE, 19.-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
item.accessRightsOpen Access-
item.validationecoom 2016-
item.contributorGENBRUGGE, Cornelia-
item.contributorBOER, Willem-
item.contributorDE DEYNE, Cathy-
item.contributorDENS, Jo-
item.contributorJANS, Frank-
item.contributorHEYLEN, Rene-
item.contributorMEEX, Ingrid-
item.contributorFerdinande, Bert-
crisitem.journal.issn1466-609X-
crisitem.journal.eissn1364-8535-
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