Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/7797
Title: Microstructural evolution of cu interconnect under AC, pulsed DC and DC current stress
Authors: BIESEMANS, Leen 
VANSTREELS, Kris 
BRONGERSMA, Sywert
D'HAEN, Jan 
DE CEUNINCK, Ward 
D'OLIESLAEGER, Marc 
Issue Date: 2007
Publisher: MATERIALS RESEARCH SOCIETY
Source: Russell, SW & Mills, ME & Osaki, A & Yoda, T (Ed.) ADVANCED METALLIZATION CONFERENCE 2006 (AMC 2006). p. 453-458.
Abstract: Damascene Cu interconnects are increasingly used as electrical connections in integrated circuits. During fabrication and operation these interconnects are subjected to temperature variations. These thermal effects cause the different layers of a microelectronic device to undergo mechanical stresses due to differences in thermal coefficients. The same thermal effects can be generated by applying a sinusoidal alternating current (AC) to a sputtered interconnect. Thermal cycling due to joule heating of the interconnect will cause thermal fatigue damage. Our goal is to study this phenomenon on dual damascene Cu interconnects and to compare these results with direct current (DC) and bipolar pulsed DC stressed samples. The outcome of these experiments demonstrate that failure under DC, bipolar pulsed DC and sinusoidal AC arise in the same way and is not a result of thermal cycling, but diffusive mechanisms. These diffusive mechanisms can be slowed down by using a passivation layer on top of the interconnect and air gaps instead of a dielectric beside the line as showed during a test.
Notes: Hasselt Univ, Inst Mat Res, Diepenbeek, B-3590 Belgium.Biesemans, L, Hasselt Univ, Inst Mat Res, Wetenschapspk 1, Diepenbeek, B-3590 Belgium.
Document URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1942/7797
ISBN: 978-1-55899-947-3
ISI #: 000245813300064
Category: C1
Type: Proceedings Paper
Validations: ecoom 2008
Appears in Collections:Research publications

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